Equity: The final week

Equity: The final week…

Week of 12/11/2017

OPENING – 30 minutes

Today I’ll be pointing you to the resources you’re going to need to complete your challenge, which includes 2 new resources that we need to discuss as a group.

Document 1: Introduction, Criteria and Example

  • This is the document we discussed in depth on Thursday of last week. Please feel free to review it if you have questions.
  • You CAN make a copy, but you don’t have to because this is not something you need to turn in.
  • You can always return here to review it.

Document 2: Equity Challenge Organizer

  • This is a new document that has a Calendar to help you stay on track, a “Family and Country Profile” to help you organize your learning, and a Story Map to help you brainstorm your story ideas.
  • You MUST make a copy because you’ll use it to stay on track and ensure you get everything done…AND I will be checking for completion of this document

Document 3: Equity Challenge Rubric (shows exactly how you’ll be graded)

  • This rubric gives you a clear understanding of the 4 key things I’ll be assessing you for on your story.
  • You CAN make a copy, but you don’t have to because this is not something you need to turn in.
  • You can always return here to review it.

ONLINE RESOURCES:

Dollar Street

  • This is the resource you’ll use to identify whose story of equity you’re going to tell.
  • As we discussed last week, this site has information in the form of text and, primarily, pictures about over 200 families in 50 countries.
  • You’ll pick 1 of these families to explore and research, and to tell your story about.

CIA World Factbook

  • Once you’ve chosen your family, as part of your exploration, you’ll do some additional research about the country your family lives in. The “Profile” on document 1 above has a number of questions you’ll want to answer about your family’s country, but you’re free to explore any other information you’d like as well. The idea is that you become familiar with the country, culture and customs of the family you are telling a story about.
  • The CIA World Factbook is one source you can use for this research, though you are welcome to use other sources as well.

LESSON – 15-60 minutes

The remainder of this week will be devoted to work time to complete your challenge. You should stay focused on the calendar provided, being sure to stay on track so you don’t fall behind. I’ll be moving around the classroom checking in with groups to ensure they are doing what needs to be done to successfully complete the challenge. Naturally, I’m available for any questions you may have.

Homework

As you know, we don’t have much homework in this class. However, for this final week, and this final challenge, I believe it’s very unlikely you’ll successfully complete your challenge if you don’t devote 15-30 mins every single night to working on your story. And that includes over the weekend. When you leave on Thursday, if you don’t refine your story, I just don’t think you’ll have a final product that is a true final draft quality ready for the day of the final.

Please, devote the time you need to finish this semester strong.

Short Term Goals

In every unit, we focus on certain short term goals. Some are goals related to content, others relate to skills, but the idea is that throughout the unit, we have opportunities to practice and improve on them.

  1. Students will distinguish between equity and equality.
  2. Students will identify different types of equity (social, political, economic, education).
  3. Students will demonstrate understanding of empathy.
  4. Students will understand the importance of storytelling.
  5. Students will develop competencies in the Investigate phase of CBL.

Help Is Near

t

Jeb is here to help...

 

Have questions?

  • Drop by before or after school
  • Come in at lunch
  • Ping me on Basecamp
  • Pass me a note

Whatever you do, don’t just
sit there wondering.
Get the help you need.

Ping Me

This Week’s Agenda

Monday

Warmup:
Introduce some key resources you’ll need for your challenge.

Lesson:
Work time.

 

Tuesday

 

Warmup:
None.

Lesson:
Work time.

 

Wednesday

 

Warmup:
None.

Lesson:
Work time.

 

Thursday

 

Warmup:
None.

Lesson:
Work time.

 

Quote of the Week

“ A point of view is the difference between a job and a career.
It’s the difference between being a cog and making an impact.”

Seth Godin

Equity Challenge, Explained…

Equity Challenge, Explained…

Thursday  12/7/2017

OPENING – 30 minutes

The moment you’ve all been waiting for. It’s time to fully explain the challenge and get you moving toward completion.

Explanation:

We’ve explored the concept of Equity for a few weeks now, and we know that equity is about fairness. And we’ve talked about equity in terms of ACCESS to opportunities and to resources. In an ideal (perfect) world, all people would have fair access to the opportunities and resources they need to thrive.

As we look around the country, and around the world, though, we can clearly see that not all people are equal. We don’t all have equitable access to free education, or clean water, or healthy food, or indoor plumbing, or clean environments…and so much more.

Your job in completing this challenge is to tell a story that shows an understanding of this reality by exploring, in depth, one of the families showcased on Gapminder’s Dollar Street website. When you’ve chosen the family you want to focus on, you’ll do some additional research on that family’s country (the CIA World Factbook would be a great resource, though you can, and probably should, use other resources as well) in order to get a better understanding of that country’s history, culture, customs, etc.

Your goal is to get an in depth understanding of how people in that country live, what they have access to, what struggles they face related to those access issues, and what joys they experience. And then you’re to tell a story about that family, or about one person in that family, in which you show evidence of your ability to see THEIR world through THEIR eyes.

Like the story you told earlier in the week, this story will be a work of fiction (not true), though it will be grounded in fact. Using the pictures on Dollar Street, and the additional research you do on your family’s country/culture, you’ll tell a story that *could* be true. And your story should help us see what life is like for that person or family, both in terms of access to opportunities and/or resources, and more generally.

NOTE: Just because some people have less access to certain opportunities and resources doesn’t mean they’re not as good as those who have plenty, or that they’re not happy. In other words, you should be careful not to assume that people who live a very different life than you are somehow always miserable or primitive.

Criteria:

  1. Your story should demonstrate creativity and effort.
  2. Your story can be either in the first or third person
    • 1st Person = “I remember the feel of the warm sun on my face…”
    • 3rd Person = “Kathryn walked slowly up the stairs, wondering what waited for her at the top.”
  3. Your story should include details that show that you have made real efforts to research and understand the country/culture that your family lives in. And the daily realities they face.
  4. Your story should be grounded in the family and country you have selected.
    • You should choose a family on the lower end of the income scale.
    • You should select a country that is not a “highly developed country.” (please do not choose a family from any of the below countries):
      • United Kingdom – United States – South Africa – China – South Korea – France – Netherlands – Sweden
  5. Your story should have at least 1 character, a very well described setting, and a plot with a beginning, middle and end.
  6. Your story should reflect refinement, and a clear attempt to produce high quality work.

 

All of this, as well as an example story, can be found on the document HERE. All of this information can also be found in the Campfire section of our Basecamp team.

LESSON – 30 minutes

Once we’re done with the above introductions and explanations for using the linked websites, etc, you’ll be free to work with your partner (of your own choosing) to begin exploring the Dollar Street site. After you feel like you’ve got a handle on the kind of information you can find there, you should agree on the family you’re going to write your story about and begin your research.

This work will take us through the last day of the semester, with some checkpoints next week to keep us on track.

Homework

As is typical for the Challenge class, there’s no homework if you use your class time wisely and remain productive. However, if that’s not what happens, then your homework is to finish your story. Or, even if you do use your time wisely, but you just want to make your story the best you can, please feel free to work on it at home.

Short Term Goals

In every unit, we focus on certain short term goals. Some are goals related to content, others relate to skills, but the idea is that throughout the unit, we have opportunities to practice and improve on them.

  1. Students will distinguish between equity and equality.
  2. Students will identify different types of equity (social, political, economic, education).
  3. Students will demonstrate understanding of empathy.
  4. Students will understand the importance of storytelling.
  5. Students will develop competencies in the Investigate phase of CBL.

Help Is Near

t

Jeb is here to help...

 

Have questions?

  • Drop by before or after school
  • Come in at lunch
  • Ping me on Basecamp
  • Pass me a note

Whatever you do, don’t just
sit there wondering.
Get the help you need.

Ping Me

This Week’s Agenda

Monday

Warmup:
None.

Lesson:
Telling Stories.

Tuesday

Warmup:
Presenting Stories.

Lesson:
Answering Guiding Questions.

Wednesday

Warmup:
Written Reflection

Lesson:
Answering Guiding Questions.

Thursday

Warmup:
Review answers to all GQs

Lesson:
Prep for completion of the challenge.

Quote of the Week

“The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.”

Stephen King

Telling Stories

Telling Stories

Monday  12/4/2017

OPENING – 0 minutes

We’re going to just jump right into our lesson today, so hold onto your hats and let’s get to it.

LESSON – 45 minutes

Today we’re focused on answering another important question as we continue along the path toward our Challenge (“Tell someone else’s story of equity”). The question we’re answering is…

What is a story?

It’s a simple question, but an important one if telling a story is the goal. So what, exactly, is a story? I referred to a number of sources to answer this question, but I like Wikipedia’s answer best…

A report of connected events, real or imaginary, presented in a sequence of written or spoken words, or still or moving images, or both, that has…

  • Characters (at least 1) – the people in the story
  • Setting – the location of the story
  • Plot – the actual story – with a beginning, middle and end

So today we’re going to practice telling stories. Not stories of equity…not yet. Just like we made videos to introduce ourselves last week…those videos didn’t have anything to do with equity. But they DID help us develop a new skill that could be useful when we make our decisions about HOW we’re going to tell our stories of equity.

So today’s storytelling, while not about equity, is a chance for you to practice using the elements of story. And in so doing, you’ll get better at telling stories which, in turn, will help you when it comes time to tell your story of equity. Make sense?

TELL ME A STORY

Homework

As is typical for the Challenge class, there’s no homework if you use your class time wisely and remain productive. However, if that’s not what happens, then your homework is to finish your story. Or, even if you do use your time wisely, but you just want to make your story the best you can, please feel free to work on it at home.

Worth keeping two things in mind…

  1. There are prizes for best story.
  2. There are limited opportunities to affect your grade, good or bad, before the end of the semester. If you’re looking to improve your grade, you should take EVERY SINGLE opportunity to show me what you’re capable of, and what you’re willing to give toward your own learning.

Short Term Goals

In every unit, we focus on certain short term goals. Some are goals related to content, others relate to skills, but the idea is that throughout the unit, we have opportunities to practice and improve on them.

  1. Students will distinguish between equity and equality.
  2. Students will identify different types of equity (social, political, economic, education).
  3. Students will demonstrate understanding of empathy.
  4. Students will understand the importance of storytelling.
  5. Students will develop competencies in the Investigate phase of CBL.

Help Is Near

t

Jeb is here to help...

 

Have questions?

  • Drop by before or after school
  • Come in at lunch
  • Ping me on Basecamp
  • Pass me a note

Whatever you do, don’t just
sit there wondering.
Get the help you need.

Ping Me

This Week’s Agenda

Monday

Warmup:
None.

Lesson:
Telling Stories.

Tuesday

Warmup:
Presenting Stories.

Lesson:
Answering Guiding Questions.

Wednesday

Warmup:
Written Reflection

Lesson:
Answering Guiding Questions.

Thursday

Warmup:
Review answers to all GQs

Lesson:
Prep for completion of the challenge.

Quote of the Week

“The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.”

Stephen King

GQ refinement and self interviews

GQ refinement and self interviews

Tuesday  11/28/2017 – OPENING – 10 minutes

We’ll be reviewing the homework from yesterday in an effort to identify what a 4, in terms of effort, looks like. We’ll see some examples, I’m sure, but we’ll also see loads of non-examples, which are also important.

LESSON – 45 minutes

We have 2 paths to travel this week, both of which work together, even if they may not seem like it.

First, we have the guiding questions (GQs) for our challenge to answer. That list was originally 41 questions strong, and the week before the break we answered the 1st 10 of them. We’ll review those together today.

For the remaining questions, I spent some time going through them and fine-tuning them. Given how much time we have left before the break, I decided to ditch the questions that I didn’t think would lead us down a very productive path. It’s not that they were bad questions (all questions have value), it’s just that many were essentially getting us to the same kind of information, or to information that I didn’t judge to be very helpful in terms of completing our challenge.

So, I’ve revised the list and prioritized the questions so that we start digging into them in an order that will help us complete our challenge in the time we have.

Which leads me to the 2nd path we need to start walking down. As I mentioned before the break, we are connecting with a classroom in Morocco. Part of this is just about gaining some additional cultural understanding by getting to know students in a different part of the world. But it’s also about developing empathy – the ability to see the world from another person’s perspective.

As we engage with them throughout the rest of the year (hopefully), we’ll get to know them and find tremendous value in that connection. Initially, though, this should be particularly helpful for our challenge because, as you may recall, the challenge asks us to ‘Tell someone else’s story of equity’. By getting to know these students, you will have some good examples from which to draw.

To begin, though, we need to introduce ourselves. And we’re going to do that in the form of video interviews. We’ll use a tool called Adobe Spark, and in so doing, we’ll be answering one really important GQ. Specifically, ‘How am I going to tell my story?’. Now, you don’t have to use Adobe Spark for your challenge, but in teaching you to use this tool, you’ll have it as an option.

An example of the video interview you are to do is below…

Homework

In order to complete our video interview, we need to answer a handful of questions, and have them ready to read aloud because the video we’re making will require us to record our spoken answers to these questions.

So your homework tonight is to answer questions 2, 3, 4 and 5 from the Interview question list. You can click on that link, but the questions are also listed below…

  • Describe the community in which you live.
  • Where were your ancestors from? When did they come to this country?
  • What are your favorite family holidays, and why?
  • Describe some traditions or celebrations that have been passed down through your family.

In all cases, you should strive to provide an answer that is thorough, clear and detailed. Please use my example video above as a guide.

Short Term Goals

In every unit, we focus on certain short term goals. Some are goals related to content, others relate to skills, but the idea is that throughout the unit, we have opportunities to practice and improve on them.

  1. Students will distinguish between equity and equality.
  2. Students will identify different types of equity (social, political, economic, education).
  3. Students will demonstrate understanding of empathy.
  4. Students will understand the importance of storytelling.
  5. Students will develop competencies in the Investigate phase of CBL.

Quote of the Week

“I don’t know that I have ever found any satisfactory answers of my own. But every time I ask it, the question is refined. That is the best of what the old heads meant when they spoke of being “politically conscious”—as much a series of actions as a state of being, a constant questioning, questioning as ritual, questioning as exploration rather than the search for certainty.”

Ta-Nehisi Coates

This Week’s Agenda

Monday
Warmup:
Reconnection discussion.

Lesson:
See, Think, Wonder activity.

Tuesday
Warmup:
Written Reflection

Lesson:
GQ work

Wednesday
Warmup:
Written Reflection

Lesson:
Adobe Spark activity.

Thursday
Warmup:
Review GQs and brainstorm GRs and GAs

Lesson:
Adobe Spark activity, continued.

Help Is Near

t

Jeb is here to help...

 

Have questions?

  • Drop by before or after school
  • Come in at lunch
  • Ping me on Basecamp
  • Pass me a note

Whatever you do, don’t just
sit there wondering.
Get the help you need.

Ping Me

Review, and Explore Equity

Review, and Explore Equity

Monday  11/27/2017 – OPENING – 15 minutes

It seems like so long since we saw each other…I’ve missed you dearly. Let’s spend some time getting reacquainted, shall we?

LESSON – 30 minutes

We’ll spend today working together on a See, Think, Wonder activity. The idea is to get us thinking critically, and in an unbiased way, about some images that will be projected up front. The process is pretty simple…

  1. Look at the image for 1 full minute, and simply observe. Look at shapes, colors, signs, the position of people, objects, etc. Take in as much detail as you can.
  2. What do you see? What details stand out? Be as specific and as thorough as possible. Try not to judge, or guess at what’s happening, simply describe what you see.
    • We’ll discuss this as a class, though you should feel free to write this down in your notes as well.
  3. What do you think is going on? What makes you say that?
    • Whatever you think is fine, but be prepared to describe the evidence you’re using to come to that conclusion.
  4. What does this make you wonder? What broader question does this image raise for you?
    • Think about what you might need to understand in order to explain what’s really going on in this picture.

Homework

Now that we’ve had a chance to do this See, Think Wonder activity as a class, you’ll get to do it on your own for homework tonight. Please go to Basecamp and find the Message Board item titled “HOMEWORK 11/27/17 – See, Think, Wonder…”, and follow the instructions.

This HW is to be done after school today – no credit will be given for work that is done after 10pm. This is not busy work, it’s purposeful, spaced-out practice to give you the opportunity to revisit important material for a few minutes. Doing it at the last minute negates much of the benefit.

Short Term Goals

In every unit, we focus on certain short term goals. Some are goals related to content, others relate to skills, but the idea is that throughout the unit, we have opportunities to practice and improve on them.

  1. Students will distinguish between equity and equality.
  2. Students will identify different types of equity (social, political, economic, education).
  3. Students will demonstrate understanding of empathy.
  4. Students will understand the importance of storytelling.
  5. Students will develop competencies in the Investigate phase of CBL.

Quote of the Week

“I don’t know that I have ever found any satisfactory answers of my own. But every time I ask it, the question is refined. That is the best of what the old heads meant when they spoke of being “politically conscious”—as much a series of actions as a state of being, a constant questioning, questioning as ritual, questioning as exploration rather than the search for certainty.”

Ta-Nehisi Coates

This Week’s Agenda

Monday

Warmup:
Reconnection discussion.

Lesson:
See, Think, Wonder activity.

Tuesday

Warmup:
Written Reflection

Lesson:
GQ work

Wednesday

Warmup:
Written Reflection

Lesson:
Adobe Spark activity.

Thursday

Warmup:
Review GQs and brainstorm GRs and GAs

Lesson:
Adobe Spark activity, continued.

Help Is Near

t

Jeb is here to help...

 

Have questions?

  • Drop by before or after school
  • Come in at lunch
  • Ping me on Basecamp
  • Pass me a note

Whatever you do, don’t just
sit there wondering.
Get the help you need.

Ping Me